What is our vision for student success in the aftermath of the pandemic?

Volume 62 | Issue 1

ARTICLES

Teacher talking with student

Policy, Research, Well-being

Distress Undermines Learning

Teacher with mask assisting student with mask

Equity, Promising Practices, Research

Taking Action to Limit Learning Impacts from the Pandemic

Happy student ready for school

Curriculum, Policy, Teaching

What Does It Mean to Be Well-Educated?

TECHSAVY

Photo of a person recording an instructional video

EdTech & Design, Engagement, Promising Practices

Making Effective Instructional Videos

LIVE Discussion – Connecting researchers and educators

DID YOU MISS THE LIVE DISCUSSION on may 16th?

This Live Discussion included two (2) parts:

  1. Part 1: 30-minute full group discussion, followed by
  2. Part 2: 45-minute small-group facilitated discussions with one researcher

This recording highlights Part 1 in which three (3) researchers tackled the question “What is our vision for student success in the aftermath of the pandemic?” through their perspectives.

This was a rare opportunity for researchers and educators to connect informally, push each other’s thinking, and spark new ideas for future education research priorities.

Watch the recording below.

About This Edition

WHAT IS OUR VISION FOR STUDENT SUCCESS IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE PANDEMIC?

How relevant are our current measures of school success (for both learning and teaching) to today’s world? Does our emphasis on individual achievement and the acquisition of a prescribed, culturally narrow knowledge base truly equip students to become global citizens? Do our goals in education and our criteria for success allow all students to flourish?

This is not a new conversation, but it has taken on new urgency with the conditions we now face. As we return cautiously to something closer to “normal” school, the disparities in where students are in terms of the curriculum are greater than ever. What, then, do we expect of students now? Some argue that we must focus heavily on “catching students up” to grade level. But is it time to rethink our goals in education? Just as climate change demands significant action, not reluctant half-measures, perhaps the education system needs to adapt more decisively to our changing world. What educational outcomes will serve children best as they move into their adult lives? What outcomes will help all students thrive, both short and long term? And what actionable strategies will help to get us there?

Read, listen and explore the key question through these multiple lenses:

  • Student mental health and wellness
  • Learning impacts
  • Diversity and anti-racism
  • Meaningful learning vs “covering” the curriculum

Our network of members and wide K-12 education community can look forward to emerging researchers contributing to:

  1. A lively one-hour podcast to highlight four researcher perspectives;
  2. In-depth feature articles to delve deeper into emerging research;
  3. A live discussion where the participants discuss with the four scholars how to bring a practical lens to their research;
  4. On-theme podcast episodes from the voicEd Radio community to bring in more perspectives;

All will be easily accessible to members.

IT’S RESEARCH YOU CAN RELATE TO.

 

This edition is sponsored in part by Courses For Teachers, by Queen’s University

 

SPONSORED CONTENT

CHARITIES ACROSS CANADA IN DIRE NEED OF COMPUTERS

by: Electronic Recycling Association

MAKING PRIVACY PROTECTION A BASIC SKILL FOR STUDENTS

by: Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC)


 

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